Let 5″ Inseam TikTok Be Your Bare-Thighed Guide To Shorts Shopping This Summer

John J. Gibson
Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

From Esquire

If you ever went to a school that had a strict dress code, you may recall the finger test. Basically, it’s this: If you’re standing up straight with your arms at your sides and your skirt is shorter than where your middle finger falls on your leg, the skirt is too short. I lost too many afternoon lessons being sent home for the length of my skirt (that is a whole different essay). So I want to reclaim that test, put my thing down, flip it, and reverse it. Here goes. Men: if your shorts are longer than where your middle finger falls on your thigh when you are standing up, they’re too long for you, bro. And if you won’t take it from me, take it from the women of TikTok. Welcome to the 5” inseam movement.

The past few weeks of this

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The Future of African Fashion Post-Pandemic, Upcoming Documentary Gives Intimate Look at Martin Margiela

John J. Gibson

Plus, beauty brands are tackling unsexy grooming concerns with slick packaging.

<em>Looks from Fruche's Spring 2019 runway show at Lagos Fashion Week in October 2018. </em>
Looks from Fruche’s Spring 2019 runway show at Lagos Fashion Week in October 2018.

These are the stories making headlines in fashion on Tuesday.

The future of African fashion post-pandemic 
Designers in Africa are particularly vulnerable to the damaging effects of Covid-19, as most of them rely on store sales, in-house production and physical shows to gain a following and run their businesses. Their survival post-pandemic will depend on using online tools to ramp up e-commerce and rethinking retailer-brand relationships. {Vogue Business

Upcoming documentary gives intimate look at Martin Margiela
Long thought of as fashion’s Banksy, we’re finally getting an intimate look at Martin Margiela through a new documentary by Reiner Holzer. Tilted “Martin Margiela: In His Own Words,” the film features interviews with Margiela himself, Jean Paul Gaultier, Carine Roitfeld, trend forecaster Lidewij

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Five things you may not know about the fashion firm

John J. Gibson

You might have bought some joggers from there, or seen your favourite Instagram star wearing one of their dresses, but how much do you really know about Boohoo?

The online fashion firm has been a real winner during lockdown, with a massive increase in its sales by 45% to £368m in the three months to the end of May.

But it’s been hit by claims that workers at a Leicester factory that supplies some of its clothes were paid just £3.50 an hour, while being offered no coronavirus protection.

Boohoo has said it’s launching an investigation, but experts say it could struggle to make a comeback after the controversy.

Here’s five things you may not know about the company.

1. The Manchester-based family behind it are billionaires

Boohoo was founded by entrepreneur Mahmud Kamani and designer Carol Kane.

The pair had worked together at Pinstripe Clothing, a company that was

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Boycott Boohoo, or Hunt for Bargains? What Will Consumers Do?

John J. Gibson

Click here to read the full article.

LONDON — After a rough few weeks, Boohoo’s share price is bouncing back, but the question remains whether its young consumer base will keep buying from the brand, which has been dogged by allegations of poor labor practices and unfair pay at one of its supplier’s factories in Leicester, England.

It remains to be seen whether the scandal will bring forth any meaningful change, or encourage consumers to stop before they shop, and think about the clothing brand, or retailer’s, ethics. Or will the controversy just be forgotten in a few months’ time, with boohoo.com’s young clientele once again turning to the retailer for cheap alternatives to the trends they spot on social media?

Recent history has shown that shoppers have short memories, and often return to fast-fashion sites because they can’t resist the social media buzz — and a good

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Delivery giant to hire 10,500 amid UK online shopping surge

John J. Gibson

Delivery giant Hermes says it will create 10,500 jobs in the UK after seeing a surge in demand from people shopping from home during lockdown.

This will include 1,500 full-time roles across its delivery network and head office, and 9,000 freelance couriers.

Hermes also said it would not accept any money from the government’s job retention bonus scheme, designed to help struggling firms.

It comes as a raft of companies make job cuts due to the pandemic.

Hermes boss Martijn de Lange said: “The pandemic has expedited the already phenomenal growth of online shopping and we see no sign of this changing.

“As a result, it is important that we have the right infrastructure and people in place to support this. This is good news for the many people who have sadly had their income affected and we are pleased to be able to support the UK economy with so

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